High Street South Side – East to West; North Side East to West; and Lower Green

HIGH STREET SOUTH SIDE – EAST TO WEST

Orchard House
Chilling House
The Cottage
The Square
Southdown House
Village Store and Post Office
Park View Cottage
West Cottage
Pump Cottage (formerly Ivy Cottage)
Village Halls
Institute Cottage
Wheelwrights Cottage
Fleur de Lis and Fleur de Lis Cottages
Old Brickmakers
Sandalwood House
Engineers Cottages
Pear Tree Cottages
Saxby Wood (formerly the site of Pear Tree Cottages and Myrtle Cottages)
Lower Mead Cottage
The Firs
Oak Cottages

 

HIGH STREET NORTH SIDE – EAST TO WEST
The White House
Rose Cottage
The Stone House and Park Cottage (formerly 1,2,3 Park Cottages)
Penshurst Entrance Lodge: Pinnacles/Pepperpot

 

LOWER GREEN:

Old Bakery
Bombers Cottage
El Vanin and Ranmore

 

MISCELLANEOUS PHOTOGRAPHS OF HOUSES IN LEIGH:

 

Illustration in 'The Revival of English Domestic Architecture. IV. The Work of Mr. Ernest George'; The Studio 8 (1896): “In a row of Cottages, Village Shops, &c., Leigh, Kent, we find a typical group of simple dwellings, welded into a harmonious whole, by no sham façade, but by the arrangement of the larger buildings at each end. In this group the unity of each house is preserved, and yet its individuality is not insisted upon unduly. The recurrent gable imparts a sense of restfulness, without any monotonous feeling of repetition. The sketch does not explain whether the penultimate house at each side is slightly larger than its neighbour; the one to the left undoubtedly is”

Illustration in ‘The Revival of English Domestic Architecture. IV. The Work of Mr. Ernest George’ The Studio 8 (1896): “In a row of Cottages, Village Shops, &c., Leigh, Kent, we find a typical group of simple dwellings, welded into a harmonious whole, by no sham façade, but by the arrangement of the larger buildings at each end. In this group the unity of each house is preserved, and yet its individuality is not insisted upon unduly. The recurrent gable imparts a sense of restfulness, without any monotonous feeling of repetition. The sketch does not explain whether the penultimate house at each side is slightly larger than its neighbour; the one to the left undoubtedly is”

The Post Office (now Southdown House) 1920s. Postcard published by J Salmon, Sevenoaks from an original watercolour by A.R. Quinton

The Post Office (now Southdown House) 1920s. Postcard published by J Salmon, Sevenoaks from an original watercolour by A.R. Quinton

Leigh High Street looking East. Note wall on left in front of what was then Park Cottages – now the Stone House and Park Cottage. The wall has in part been demolished to make way for car access. On the right the first house of The Square.

 

 

 

High Street looking East from Southdown House. Postcard, 1940s

High Street looking East from Southdown House. Postcard, 1940s

High Street looking East from just above Lower Green. Postcard, c. 1940s

High Street looking East from just above Lower Green. Postcard, c. 1940s

High Street in Winter. Christmas card produced 1990

High Street in Winter. Christmas card produced 1990

Penshurst Road from the four charity cottages (now the site of Saxby Wood) to the Brickmakers. Postcard postmarked 1915

Penshurst Road from the four charity cottages (now the site of Saxby Wood) to the Brickmakers. Postcard postmarked 1915

Oak Cottages - High Street, Leigh - at turn off to the Leigh allotments

Oak Cottages, High St, Leigh (just at turn off to the Leigh allotments). Photo from The Studio 1887, vol. 10 p. 178

 

Lower Green from Old Bakery to junction with High Street. Photo mid-1970s

Lower Green from Old Bakery to junction with High Street. Photo mid-1970s

Lower Green, looking towards the High St. with the Bakery on the left and The Brickmaker public house in the centre, c. 1920

Lower Green, looking towards the High St. with the Bakery on the left and The Brickmaker public house in the centre, c. 1920

Lower Green through the Railway Bridge. Photograph from the album of Rev. Octavius Walton (vicar of Leigh 1906-18)

Lower Green through the Railway Bridge. Photograph from the album of Rev. Octavius Walton (vicar of Leigh 1906-18)